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A Hand of Silver is Better than a Hand Full of Rheumatism

30 Mar

LetterImage

Summit, NJ
Oct 1, 1895

From: William A Gray (ill at home)
To: Ruth Barrell, New Providence, NJ

Dear Ruth:

I presume your conclusion after not seeing me at any time on Sunday was that I was
again victimized by that pet disease which I have been nursing for some time back. Of
course that conclusion was or would have been quite correct for yesterday was the first
time since Saturday that I have been able to use my right hand.

I had the presumption to anticipate spending Sunday rather differently than I have
for some time back and you can imagine my disappointment when Saturday evening came
to find that my hand and wrist were so united that one would think that some of Sunday’s
nights frost had gotten into it. It made me think of the afterward conclusion of the story you
read aloud “A hand of silver is better than a hand full of rheumatism”  

However, to drop this disagreeable subject I am straightening out once more for I
feel it oozing out my finger ends and I hope the dread disease will by this time have gotten
tired of occupying such monotonous soil and seek lovelier climes.

I have been wondering if you went down Monday and if you did how you fared. It
seems that if Mondays are not stormy, they are made disagreeable in other ways.
I hope you got home safely without realizing any bad effects. I was half expectant of
seeing Bessie Monday morning, but I attribute her not stopping to the cold.

I am writing under difficulties. It is rather cold here in the hall and my hand is not yet
so limber that I can use it at all freely, so that I guess I will close. My chief desire is to find
out if you are well which I sincerely hope you are.

Remember me to all, and if everything goes right, I at least hope to see you by the
time of our next holiday. But I shall entertain no rash hopes. “Man proposes, but God
disposes.”

So
Good Bye
Sincerely

Will

P.S.

If you can’t read this
please not blame me, but
rheumatism.

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Posted by on March 30, 2013 in Family History

 

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